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The Channel "goes live"

Groundbreaking collective giving initiative The Channel has reached a significant milestone as it goes live and begins to accept donations from its first round of founding members.

Launched in May, the Channel is Australia's first LGBTQIA+ giving circle. And it has set itself the target of granting $100,000 to LGBTQIA+ opportunities by the end of 2017.

Members will be able to make monthly donations of $25, $50 and $100, and will play a key role in voting on where and to whom grants will be distributed. Everyone who joins before the end of 2016 will be a Founding Member.

Georgia Mathews - the Channel's founder - said the giving circle was born out of a recognition that there's great social change work going on in the Australian queer community, but that funding was "very scarce".

"There's not a lot of data on LGBTQIA+ giving in Australia. However, in the States, for every $100 awarded by foundations only 28 cents go to LGBTQIA+ issues. That's less than any other disadvantaged group."

Channel board director and LGBTI political leader Neil Pharaoh said: "This is a great opportunity to turn contributions from our community into meaningful projects and outcomes."

To join as a member, or for more information, visit www.the-channel.org

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